15-16 JUNE 2016 / Tour & Taxis / Brussels

Inclusive & sustainable education systems

Inclusive & sustainable education systems

Tuesday, November 26, 2013 -
14:00 to 15:30

Key points

  • Poverty eradication and sustainable development depend on universal access to quality education.
  • Increased funding for education is required.
  • Children need the education and demanded in the 21st century.
  • Teachers need training to effectively and innovatively use technology.

 

 

Synopsis

Providing access to good quality education to all children and young people must be a high priority on the post-2015 agenda. Poverty eradication and sustainable development depend on educated young people with the 21st century knowledge and skills needed to make valuable contributions to society and economic growth.

Today, there is a crisis in education. More than 120 million school age children and youth are not in school and 250 million young people leave school unable to read or write. Despite the obvious needs, funding for education by donors and nations has decreased in recent years.

Speakers examined initiatives at global, national and local levels to promote inclusive and sustainable quality education systems.

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) brings together developing countries, donors, multi-lateral agencies, civil society organisations (CSOs) and the private sector with the aim to get all children into school for a quality education. It focuses on fragile and conflict-afflicted countries, girls’ education, basic learning outcomes, teacher effectiveness and increased funding. It provides funding for national programmes and supports civil society monitoring of progress of national education plans.

IDAY is an international network of African and European CSOs that aims to eliminate barriers to access to quality education in Africa. One initiative focuses on young people employed as domestic workers – a group that frequently lacks access to education. This initiative seeks to provide education and better employment opportunities to young domestic workers by promoting flexible school schedules and recognised skill certifications.

Drawing on its historical experience, Latvia seeks to improve its educational systems with initiatives to support and mainstream children with special needs, and to promote diversity, multilingualism and multiculturalism in its schools. School instruction in several languages fosters inclusiveness and develops a workforce attractive to businesses competing in a globalized world.

In Cameroon, the Fond Spécial d’Equipment et d’Intervention Intercommunale (FEICOM), a government agency, has provided funding to local communities to build schools. Since inception, it has funded the construction of 11,000 classrooms.

Recognising that education is vital to development and the growth of new markets for its products, Microsoft provides significant funding and support for education and education system reform in several ways, including by providing free software to schools, and training for both teachers and students in the use of ICT. The company believes that the key is training teachers to use technology in innovative ways so they impart to students the skills needed for productive employment in the 21st century. Technology can help solve teacher shortage problems through online communications.

Drawing on its historical experience, Latvia seeks to improve its educational systems with initiatives to support and mainstream children with special needs, and to promote diversity, multilingualism and multiculturalism in its schools. School instruction in several languages fosters inclusiveness and develops a workforce attractive to businesses competing in a globalized world.

 

Insight

Universal access to quality education must be high on the post-2015 development agenda.