7-8 JUNE 2017 / Tour & Taxis / Brussels

Fragility and resilience

By 2030 the majority of the world's poor will be concentrated in fragile and conflict-affected contexts. Poverty, violence, conflict, fragility and forced displacement are inter-linked and must be addressed in a coherent and comprehensive way. Fragility intensifies poverty and undermines the opportunities for individuals and societies to escape poverty. On the other hand, poverty increases vulnerability and high levels of vulnerability aggravate the chronic effects of poverty. According to the OECD, the number of people living in extreme poverty will fall globally, but the number of extremely poor people living in fragile contexts will increase by 2035.

Protracted crises and conflicts place a huge burden on national and international resources and on the fulfilment of human rights. The Global Strategy for EU external action supports resilience at all levels, addressing the ability of states and societies to withstand and recover from internal and external shocks and crises. It will also reflect that, echoing the SDGs, resilience is a broad concept, encompassing all individuals and the whole of society and, consistent with the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 and the Paris Agreement on climate change, involves dealing with vulnerability to risks from socioeconomic conditions and climate change as well as disasters and conflicts.

The EU has a major global presence through its extensive diplomatic networks, including in post-conflict and fragile contexts. It will use the whole range of tools at its disposal to prevent, manage and help resolve conflicts and crises, meet humanitarian needs and build lasting peace and good governance, focusing on fragility, human security and recognising the nexus between sustainable development, peace and security. The EU and its Member States will also work with security sector actors, including military actors under exceptional circumstances, towards the achievement of peaceful and inclusive societies. They will also focus their efforts on preventing and countering violent extremism by strengthening the resilience of individuals, communities and states to the appeal of radicalisation and violent extremism, including through fostering religious tolerance and inter religious dialogue. They will make efforts to tackle urban crime and violence and continue to support the principle of responsibility to protect and prevent atrocity crimes.

While promoting and protecting human rights, democracy, rule of law and good governance, the EU will seek to improve partnerships and coordination , including a deeper exchange of information, efficient donor coordination, joint analysis of risks and vulnerabilities, joint programming, transition strategies and conflict prevention.

Related sessions

Fragility and resilience
auditorium A3
8 June
14:30 to 16:00
Fragility and resilience
debate D5
7 June
14:00 to 15:15
Fragility and resilience
debate D4
7 June
14:00 to 15:15
Fragility and resilience
debate D6
7 June
16:15 to 17:30
Fragility and resilience
debate D2
7 June
16:15 to 17:30
Fragility and resilience
debate D4
8 June
09:00 to 10:15
Fragility and resilience
debate D2
8 June
10:45 to 12:00
Fragility and resilience
project S3
7 June
18:00 to 19:15
Fragility and resilience
project S1
8 June
10:45 to 12:00
Fragility and resilience
project S4
8 June
13:30 to 14:45
Fragility and resilience
brainstorming B2
7 June
18:00 to 19:15
Fragility and resilience
performance Outdoor stage
Fragility and resilience
performance Outdoor stage
Fragility and resilience
exhibition