7-8 JUNE 2017 / Tour & Taxis / Brussels

Tell My Story: Lorenzo Natali Media Prize Award Ceremony

Tell My Story: Lorenzo Natali Media Prize Award Ceremony

EDD17 - Replay - Tell My Story: Lorenzo Natali Media Prize Award Ceremony

special event
A3
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 -
18:00 to 19:30

Key points

  • After receiving more than 500 applications, the European Commission awarded 11 awards for the Lorenzo Natali Media Prize for outstanding reporting on development, poverty eradication and freedom of religion.
     
  • An independent jury of experts in development, journalism and human rights selected winners. Each prize is worth €5,000. 

Synopsis

After receiving more than 500 applications from around the world, the European Commission awarded 11 Lorenzo Natali Media Prizes to journalists for outstanding reporting on development, poverty eradication and freedom of religion.

Awards, worth €5,000 each, were presented to amateur and professional journalists from Africa; the Arab world and Middle East; Asia and Pacific; Latin America and the Caribbean; and Europe. This year included a special prize on Freedom of Religion or Belief outside the EU.

For Africa in the professional category, Daniel Addeh won for his story on school children in Togo whose lives were transformed when a start-up gave them access to solar powered lights. The lights enabled children to study at night and avoid exhausting manual labour by day to pay for batteries. In the amateur category, Martin Kaba of Burkina Faso won for reporting on his government’s efforts to bring solar energy to rural communities.

For the Arab world and the Middle East in the professional category, Nehal El-Sherif won for her audio story on rural savings and loan associations in Egypt that empower women to start small businesses. No award was given in the amateur category in this region.

For Asia and the Pacific in the professional category, Umar Manzoor Shah won for his profile on the lives of disabled children in Kashmir who the Catholic Social Service Society supports with medical treatment. Saurabh Sharma’s wrenching story on the hardships faced by homeless girls in India won the amateur prize. For his courageous reporting on a taboo subject, Sharma also won an additional grand prize.

In Europe in the professional category, Peter Lind won for his investigative report on abusive child labour practices in Madagascar, the world's largest producer of vanilla. Amateur journalist, Maria Zornorsa won for shining a spotlight on the child labour and other abuses faced by Syrian refugees living in Turkey.

In Latin America and the Caribbean, Fernanda Maldonado won for her multimedia story on modern day slavery on farms in the Brazilian state of Panara. No award was given in the amateur category in this region.

For the special prize on Freedom of Religion or Belief in the professional category, Delphine Bauer won for her story on two refugees who fled Tunisia for France after being persecuted for renouncing religion in their lives. In the amateur category, Ousame Drabo won for his report on a village in Burkina Faso where Christians and Muslims are co-existing with respect despite growing religious extremism nearby.

An independent jury of experts in development, journalism and human rights selected winners. Jury members included Sanitsuda Ekachai (Bangkok Post and Press Council of Thailand), Nazila Ghanea (University of Oxford), Richard Jones (Devex), Julie Majerczak (Reporters Without Borders), Ines Pohl (Deutsche Welle), Alana Rizzo (Brazilian Association of Investigative Journalism), and Sybella Wilkes (UNHCR).

Insight

In her acceptance speech, journalist Maria Zorzona explained that she knew she had to tell the story of the Syrian children she met in Turkey. The abuses they faced were intolerable and the best thing she could do was to give them a voice. The prize was an affirmation of her belief in the importance of journalism and the fundamental values of democracy and human rights at the heart of Europe. It made her proud to be a European, especially as her family members were once refugees fleeing Syria. The EU’s Special Envoy for freedom of religion of belief outside the EU, Jan Figel, said the prize is a testament to European tolerance and multiculturalism. It speaks for itself about European values, and our respect for journalists who courageously give voice to the voiceless.
  • Moderator
    Katrina Sichel
    TV Producer and Presenter
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