15-16 JUNE 2016 / Tour & Taxis / Brussels

Inclusive & sustainable education systems

<p>The discussions on the post-2015 development agenda focus on determining the new set of objectives and priorities needed to achieve quality education for all: tapping into new technologies to improve access to and the quality of education, and focusing on equity and the relevance of the skills imparted to learners whilst fostering gender-sensitive approaches.</p> <p>Drawing up an ambitious yet relevant post-2015 development agenda and appropriate strategies requires an approach whereby development aid investments support locally decided strategies and local successes, whilst fostering greater democratic ownership and accountability.</p> <p>The session will therefore seek to analyse and debate on the strategies and priorities to allow young people in developing countries to acquire relevant professional skills so they can effectively take part in a sustainable and inclusive development process.&nbsp;</p> <p>The session will also focus on the education challenges faced by local authorities and present education systems that effectively accommodate the vulnerable youth by equipping them with the relevant skills such. The cases of professional training of young domestic workers and new technologies will illustrate such education systems.</p>
Place: 
Auditorium C
Session type: 
Auditorium
date: 
Tuesday, November 26, 2013 -
14:00 to 15:30
Key Points: 
  • Poverty eradication and sustainable development depend on universal access to quality education.
  • Increased funding for education is required.
  • Children need the education and demanded in the 21st century.
  • Teachers need training to effectively and innovatively use technology.

 

 

Synopsis: 

Providing access to good quality education to all children and young people must be a high priority on the post-2015 agenda. Poverty eradication and sustainable development depend on educated young people with the 21st century knowledge and skills needed to make valuable contributions to society and economic growth.

Today, there is a crisis in education. More than 120 million school age children and youth are not in school and 250 million young people leave school unable to read or write. Despite the obvious needs, funding for education by donors and nations has decreased in recent years.

Speakers examined initiatives at global, national and local levels to promote inclusive and sustainable quality education systems.

The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) brings together developing countries, donors, multi-lateral agencies, civil society organisations (CSOs) and the private sector with the aim to get all children into school for a quality education. It focuses on fragile and conflict-afflicted countries, girls’ education, basic learning outcomes, teacher effectiveness and increased funding. It provides funding for national programmes and supports civil society monitoring of progress of national education plans.

IDAY is an international network of African and European CSOs that aims to eliminate barriers to access to quality education in Africa. One initiative focuses on young people employed as domestic workers – a group that frequently lacks access to education. This initiative seeks to provide education and better employment opportunities to young domestic workers by promoting flexible school schedules and recognised skill certifications.

Drawing on its historical experience, Latvia seeks to improve its educational systems with initiatives to support and mainstream children with special needs, and to promote diversity, multilingualism and multiculturalism in its schools. School instruction in several languages fosters inclusiveness and develops a workforce attractive to businesses competing in a globalized world.

In Cameroon, the Fond Spécial d’Equipment et d’Intervention Intercommunale (FEICOM), a government agency, has provided funding to local communities to build schools. Since inception, it has funded the construction of 11,000 classrooms.

Recognising that education is vital to development and the growth of new markets for its products, Microsoft provides significant funding and support for education and education system reform in several ways, including by providing free software to schools, and training for both teachers and students in the use of ICT. The company believes that the key is training teachers to use technology in innovative ways so they impart to students the skills needed for productive employment in the 21st century. Technology can help solve teacher shortage problems through online communications.

Drawing on its historical experience, Latvia seeks to improve its educational systems with initiatives to support and mainstream children with special needs, and to promote diversity, multilingualism and multiculturalism in its schools. School instruction in several languages fosters inclusiveness and develops a workforce attractive to businesses competing in a globalized world.

 

Insight: 

Universal access to quality education must be high on the post-2015 development agenda. 

  • Body: Moving forward we need to look at the access to and quality of education.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1457
  • Body: More aid is being provided through loans and scholarships, but this has little effect on basic education. Aid to basic education decreased by USD 400 million between 2010 and 2011.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1456
  • Body: Informality breeds abuse in domestic work. If there is regulation, we can deal with problems such as relatives taking childen out of school.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1454
  • Body: Enabling African youth to obtain education is not just about safeguarding their human dignity, but also working towards ensuring sustainable development.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1453
  • Body: It is not possible to achieve quality basic education for all, because there are very many obstacles along the way. Some of these obstacles are social, some are cultural and some are economic.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1452
  • Body: School enrolment rates are over 90 % in former Soviet states, but the education systems struggle to reach children with special needs.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1451
  • Body: When technology is used effectively we see long-term economic benefits such as greater graduation rates, increased use of e-Government services, reduced savings in crime and incarceration, and decreased reliance on publicly funded services.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1450
  • Body: Many governments think the answer to challenges in their education systems lies in devices like computers, tablets, and mobile phones. We try to dispel the idea that devices alone will transform their system into a 21st century education system.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1449
  • Body: Today’s workplace is one where multiculturalism and multilingualism are very common. Even children coming out of school systems in developing countries need to know how to work in very multicultural environments. It’s very important that those students have the right skills to come out of the school system to be successful in work and life.
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    Quote Year: 2013
    Speaker:
    Nid: 1448
  • Education
    Body:

    The EU promotes access to quality basic education for all children, youth and adults. This global commitment was agreed through the international Education for All movement. The achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of universal primary education and gender equality in education is also a key priority of the EU Commission’s development policy. This is reflected in the EU’s allocation of more than EUR 4.2 billion on education, including Higher Education, between 2007 and 2012. Due to EU support some 13.7 million pupils have been enrolled between 2004 and 2012 and 1.1 million primary teachers have been trained.

    The latest EU policy for development ‘Increasing the Impact of EU Development Policy: An Agenda for Change’ (2011) highlights the importance of education as part of its support for social inclusion and human development, with the aim to foster inclusive and sustainable growth.

    In practice, this includes addressing the challenges of access, quality, equity and relevance of education, as well as ensuring the provision of skills that respond to labour market needs. The Agenda for Change commits the EU to allocating at least 20 % of its 2014-20 aid budget for human development and social inclusion.

    In its February 2013 Communication ‘A Decent Life for All’, the EU resolved to move from the purely quantitative education goals of the MDGs, towards the promotion of quality education for all. In May 2013, at an EU High Level Conference, Commissioner for Development Andris Piebalgs pledged to ensure that by 2030 every child will be able to complete basic education, regardless of their circumstances, and have basic literacy and numeracy skills.

    In this regard, in May 2013 the Commission announced that it expected to mobilise as much as EUR 4 billion for education in the next programming period (2014-20).

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