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26-27 November 2013Brussels - Tour & Taxis

Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health

Quotes

Jacquelyne Alesi

Programmes Director, Network of Young People Living with HIV/AIDS in Uganda

Years of participation : 2013

Related sessions

‘The meaningful involvement and participation of people with AIDS is needed. Let people living with HIV be part of all the decisions that are made.’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


Michael Cashman

Member of the European Parliament - Moderator

Years of participation : 2013

Related sessions

‘We need to make the case for AIDS, health and human rights – that trinity – to be prominently positioned in the post-2015 agenda.’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


Ann-Sofie Nilsson

Director-General for International Development Cooperation, Sweden

Years of participation : 2013

Related sessions

‘It's extremely important to work with young people who can take HIV/AIDS not as a catastrophe, but as a challenge – something to adapt to and live with.’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


‘We should align our support as much as we can to national health systems but we should also talk to our leaders [...] We need to prioritise, focus on getting results and make the best of the resources that we have.’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


MacDonald Sembereka

Special Adviser to the President of Malawi

Years of participation : 2013

Related sessions

‘If you don't talk human rights, you are not respecting the rights of the people.’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


Joyce Banda

President of Malawi

Years of participation : 2013, 2012

Related sessions

‘We are at a critical tipping point. We must seize this opportunity of defeating AIDS and advancing global health. ’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


Baba Gumbala

International HIV/AIDS Alliance (IHAA)

Years of participation : 2013

Related sessions

‘As long as discrimination and stigmatisation are not at the centre of discussions, we are always going to have problems.’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


‘Public health stakeholders have to ensure that the post-MDG agenda continues to take public health issues like HIV/AIDS into account. ’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


Siddharth Chatterjee

Chief Diplomat at the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Years of participation : 2013

Related sessions

‘We have set the foundation and the cornerstone for dealing with a multitude of diseases, not just non-communicable diseases but also vaccine-preventable diseases and others – and it is because the health systems are being reinforced. ’

2013


Session: Defeating AIDS - Advancing global health


News & Views

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Speakers

Jacquelyne Alesi

Programmes Director, Network of Young People Living with HIV/AIDS in Uganda

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Joyce Banda

President of Malawi

Year(s) of participation:
2013, 2012

Dr Alvaro Bermejo

Executive Director, International HIV/AIDS Alliance

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Michael Cashman

Member of the European Parliament - Moderator

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Siddharth Chatterjee

Chief Diplomat at the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Julia Duncan-Cassell

Minister for Gender and Development, Liberia

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Bekele Geleta

Secretary General, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Baba Gumbala

International HIV/AIDS Alliance (IHAA)

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Ann-Sofie Nilsson

Director-General for International Development Cooperation, Sweden

Year(s) of participation:
2013

MacDonald Sembereka

Special Adviser to the President of Malawi

Year(s) of participation:
2013

Videos

SK: Use of larvae for wound treatment in Kenya - V4AID, 2013

Bio-therapy represents an alternative way of treatment of several serious diseases in the society where conventional therapy fails. Although the larval treatment effect has been well known since 16th century, its use was not so popular in Slovak medicine until 2007. Then a Slovak company called Scientica established a green bottle fly (Lucilia sericata) colony in 2007 to produce sterile larvae for their Slovak patients in Slovakia. Peter Takáč talks on how they introduced this method also in Kenya in December 2010 and why the larval therapy is ideal for the African conditions. More info: www.V4Aid.eu The interview took place in the context of the V4Aid project, which is financed by the European Union Fund. Produced by: Slovak NGDO Platform (www.mvro.sk) Director: Mária Martiniaková (https://vimeo.com/user11279440) Cinematography: Richard Chomo, Maxim Kľujev Sound: Ján Flaškár Editor: Richard Chomo Subtitles translated by: Pro-Translation, s.r.o. (www.preklad.eu.sk)

Health

Poverty generates ill health, and poor health, in turn, increases vulnerability and poverty. The growing burden of non-communicable diseases increasingly also affects the poor. However, reducing the burden of infectious diseases remains essential and a prerequisite to reduce malnutrition. Controlling diseases is also a key element for economic growth. Therefore, the EU is strongly committed to increasing equitable access to quality health services in developing countries, whilst ensuring social protection against the financial risks of disease, strengthening social inclusion and boosting global health.

In line with its Communication on ‘The EU Role in Global Health’, the EU pursues a rights-based approach to health and provides support to developing countries to develop their health policies. Support is also given to strengthen health systems and ensure that health is appropriately considered in other policies, in order to reduce inequalities in health and in access to healthcare, to improve the quality of care, to provide more comprehensive services and to protect against the financial risks of excessive health costs – also ensuring that women’s health concerns are appropriately considered.

While the EU is a major supporter of global health initiatives – such as the Global Fund to fight HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and the GAVI Alliance for Immunisations – and of the specialised UN organisations – such as the World Health Organization – the main focus of the EU’s assistance in the health sector is to provide support directly to partner countries and support countries’ own efforts to achieve universal health coverage.

In the Communication ‘An Agenda for Change’ on EU development policy, the EU confirms its commitment to health by announcing that at least 20 % of its 2014-20 aid budget will be allocated for human development and social inclusion, including health. Furthermore, the 2013 Communication on the post-2015 global development goals sets out the EU’s intention to provide a balanced approach to poverty eradication and sustainable development, ensuring basic living standards, including health, for all.

Auditorium C Wednesday 27 November 2013 - 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM

How can HIV and health be addressed in the post-2015 development agenda?

The MDGs fuelled the scaling-up of global and national responses to address the health, human, social and development challenges posed by HIV. Yet, in spite of promising results, AIDS is not over. As the world seeks to define a new development agenda and accountability framework, the opportunity must be seized to further the achievements of the AIDS response, and to usher in a new era of social justice, health and sustainable development. The UNAIDS and Lancet Commission: Defeating AIDS – Advancing global health, was launched in May 2013 to allow global leaders to deliberate on the following three questions:

  1. What will it take to end AIDS?
  2. ...

How can HIV and health be addressed in the post-2015 development agenda?

The MDGs fuelled the scaling-up of global and national responses to address the health, human, social and development challenges posed by HIV. Yet, in spite of promising results, AIDS is not over. As the world seeks to define a new development agenda and accountability framework, the opportunity must be seized to further the achievements of the AIDS response, and to usher in a new era of social justice, health and sustainable development. The UNAIDS and Lancet Commission: Defeating AIDS – Advancing global health, was launched in May 2013 to allow global leaders to deliberate on the following three questions:

  1. What will it take to end AIDS?
  2. How can lessons from the AIDS response inform global health?
  3. How must the global health architecture be modernized to achieve sustainable global health?

The aim of the panel is to engage European development actors in the work of the Commission and in shaping the future of HIV, health and development in the post-2015 agenda.  

More informations
  • A goal of the post-2015 agenda should be to eliminate HIV/AIDS and end discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS.
  • In many countries, this will require cultural sensitivity and nuanced dialogue.
  • Community-based initiatives and integrated basic health systems are needed.
  • Donor fatigue and limited budgets will likely require countries recently achieving middle-income status to shoulder more responsibility.

 

Speakers focused on how HIV/AIDS, health and development should figure in the post-2015 agenda. The goal should be creating a future with zero HIV/AIDS and zero discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS.

The UNAIDS and Lancet Commission is bringing together all stakeholders to issue a report in 2014, generate a higher level of commitment and consider how successes in the fight against HIV/AIDS may inform effective responses to other communicable and non-communicable diseases.

A continuing critical challenge in defeating HIV/AIDS is ending discrimination against and stigmatization and exclusion of HIV-positive people and people living with AIDS. People living with HIV/AIDS should be visible, at the centre of decision-making and understood to be a critical part of the solution.

Changing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS is key. This will require cultural sensitivity and nuanced dialogue, particularly in developing countries where religious and cultural traditions can foster hostility towards high risk groups such as sex workers, members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community, and intravenous drug users.

A human rights based approach is necessary, but may be more persuasively expressed if couched in terms of human dignity, rather than human rights, which prompts suspicious responses in some countries. The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies in Somalia overcame hostility to any public discussion of sex and condom use by enlisting Somalian diaspora and using culturally sensitive approaches.

HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment must focus on community-based initiatives and be integrated into primary health structures. HIV-positive women can be valuable mentors for other HIV-positive pregnant women. The participation of young people is critical to the fight against HIV/AIDS. Today, HIV-positive youth are not seeing their condition as a disaster, but rather as a challenge that can be dealt with. The message to HIV-positive people should be that you can live with this condition as a full participant in the community.

Non-communicable diseases are often associated with HIV/AIDS increases people’s vulnerability to non-communicable diseases, particularly the elderly.  Health strategies must deal with both communicable and non-communicable diseases.

Given the successes over the last 20 years in addressing HIV/AIDS, there is danger of donor complacency and a watering down of support. HIV/AIDS continues to be a major health problem in many countries that recently acquired middle-income status. The reality is that in the post-2015 world they will have to shoulder much more responsibility for funding and programmes. Political will and leadership will be required.

 

The post-2015 development agenda can learn from the world’s response to HIV/AIDS in dealing with health and human rights issues.

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